Author Archives: Age UK

General Election Series: A rallying call for a great place to grow older

Older campaignersThis week’s blog from our General Election Series focuses on Age UK’s General Election Rally, which was held on Tuesday 24 March 2015.

Yesterday, Age UK held a General Election Rally event to give older people the opportunity hear from representatives from the five main political parties about their policies to make the UK ‘a great place to grow older’.

Although the media coverage over the last 24 hours has focused predominantly on the audience’s heckling of the Prime Minister, our first speaker, there was much more to the day. Continue reading

The Budget 2015 – Age UK reaction

The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne

The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne

The Chancellor, George Osborne, has this week announced the Budget for 2015/16. Mike Smith, joint Head of Public Affairs at Age UK, looks at how the Government’s proposals will affect older people. 

Yesterday afternoon the Chancellor, George Osborne, stepped up to the despatch box to deliver the final Budget of this Government. This was always going to be a highly political Budget, with one eye firmly focussed on the election which is now just seven 7 weeks away. At Age UK we were looking out for announcements most likely to impact on older people up and down the country, as well as what was ‘missing’ – proposals we have been calling for which may not have been included.

So what was the main announcement in the Budget affecting older people? The most significant budget announcements for many older people are the pensions reforms for those who have already taken out an annuity. This follows the radical reforms to private pensions set out in last year’s Budget. This time around, the Chancellor announced that from April next year pensioners who already have a pension annuity will be able to sell their annuity income to a third party. This is likely to be welcomed by many older people who have taken out an annuity and feel they may have missed out on the reforms which come into effect in April.  Continue reading

General Election Series: Care for today and tomorrow

440x210_care_home

This week’s blog from our General Election Series focuses on the importance of  having access to quality health and care services for all of us as we age. 

We are living in an increasingly ageing society. There are 11 million people aged 65 or over in the UK, 3 million of whom are aged 80 or over. The number of people over 85 in the UK is predicted to double in the next 20 years and nearly treble in the next 30. This is by any measure a triumph to be celebrated.

However we are far from being prepared for all the consequences of our longer lives. The social care system is a case in point. Care services are being cut – between 2005/6 and 2013/14 the proportion of people aged 65+ receiving care fell from 15.3% to 9.1%. This means over 380,000 fewer people receiving care than a decade ago. The number of people receiving home care has fallen by over 30%. Preventative services like day care and meals on wheels have been cut by over 60%. Continue reading

Government consultation on the proposed cap on care costs: but does the cap fit?

Jenny And James - Age Uk Case Study by Sam Mellish

Many of us as we get older will need help from social care to help with things like washing, dressing and preparing meals. But paying for care can be hugely expensive and many people find themselves having to spend all of their savings for this support in later life. The Government is proposing introducing a lifetime cap on care costs in a bid to help those facing catastrophic care costs.

What’s being proposed?

Once an individual spends £72,000 on their care the Government will take over paying their costs. The idea is that this will protect people from using up all of their savings in order to fund their care. Alongside this, people will be able to keep more in savings before being eligible for financial support. Watch our film to find out more.

Whilst this sounds like a good idea in theory, there are several issues with the proposal that affect how the cap will work in practice for older people.

Firstly, you have to be assessed by your Local Authority as having high enough needs to be eligible for care (information from page 23.) This means the cap will only apply to people with higher support needs, and money people have already spent on their care won’t count towards the cap.

Continue reading