Author Archives: Andy Glyde

Can robots solve the care crisis?

robotAt Age UK, we regularly have discussions about the sorts of things that need to happen to bring about an end to the care crisis once and for all. One of the suggestions (normally with tongue at least partly in cheek) is that we all simply need a robot.

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Who should get social care?

Scene from a care homeAge UK is urging older people, their families and carers, to add their voice to the national eligibility criteria consultation to help ensure it is set at a fair level. In this blog post we tell you why it is so important to get involved.

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Carers Week: Suzy’s story (part 2)

This week is Carers Week – a time to celebrate the contribution of the 6.5 million unpaid carers in the UK. It is also the moment when several charities, including Age UK, come together to call for better support for carers.

Suzy shares her story of being a carer. In part 1, Suzy explained what it’s like to care for her mother with dementia. Today, she explains about the challenges of getting the support she needs.

The difficulties we face in caring for Mum come when we seek help from outside our home when the services that are offered seem to be one size fits all.

We have been offered respite care. This means Mum going into a local care home. This would mean Mum being away from us in a building she doesn’t know with people she doesn’t know.

Mum would not settle in this environment, I know that. We would also run the risk that Mum would not remember her own home on return from respite care.

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Carers Week: Suzy’s story (part 1)

This week is Carers Week – a time to celebrate the contribution of the 6.5 million unpaid carers in the UK. It’s also the moment when several charities, including Age UK, come together to call for better support for carers.

In the first part of our 2-part blog, Suzy shares her story of what it’s like to be carer.

I am a carer for my Mum who is 67 years old and lives with dementia. Of course I wouldn’t normally describe myself as that; I’m just a daughter who loves her Mum.

I have a wonderful family who care for each other deeply. We all live together in Chepstow: Mum, Dad, my husband, 2 children and I in a multi-generational home.

You know how sometimes you look at your child/niece/nephew/grandchild and have a glimpse of how they are suddenly looking older, more grown up? Sometimes I look at Mum and see her gently moving further away in her dementia. Not every time I see her, just sometimes.

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