Guest blog – No Place like Home

By the sink best

This week we have a guest blog from Ciaran Osborne, Policy and Research Manager, at Leonard Cheshire Disability

Feeling comfortable where we live is important to all of us.

Nobody wants to have a home they love turned into a prison because they can no longer get in the front door, or because they have to wash at the kitchen sink and use a commode in the living room because their only bathroom is upstairs.

But sadly, that’s exactly the position that too many of us are in. Today, at Leonard Cheshire Disability we have published a new report setting out the shocking scale of the housing crisis facing older and disabled people.

Our “No Place like Home” report reveals that up to 300,000 disabled people will spend Christmas trapped in exactly those circumstances. Continue reading

The ongoing pain of excess winter deaths

An older woman in bed

The figures for ‘excess winter deaths’ for last winter (2013-14) are mercifully down on the truly awful figures for the previous year. But this is no cause for celebration. It is a grim reminder that the debate about energy is not just about prices, but is also about lives, illness and misery.

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Older, not colder

An older woman reading her fuel bill

The weather may still be relatively mild, but there’s no doubt that winter is just around the corner and for many older people, this is a huge worry. Age UK’s new research has found that 1 in 3 older people are concerned about keeping their home adequately warm this coming winter, and 70 per cent of older people are concerned about the high cost of energy.

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Are people really ‘over-saving’ for retirement?

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Defining what makes an ‘adequate’ retirement income is always going to be tricky. It’s inherently difficult to know exactly what people’s spending choices and needs are likely to be, or how they will adjust to stopping work.

Add in the changing nature of retirement, where increasing numbers of people are working past their State Pension age, it becomes even harder.

New paper, new ideas?

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) recently published a paper investigating a new method of looking at retirement incomes. It identifies an ‘optimum’ level of pension saving for each couple household. Instead of income band, this is based on a range of personal circumstances (e.g. number of children) and an
assessment of spending patterns. It then evaluates whether people have saved below, at, above or the ‘optimal’ level required to achieve a comparable standard of living for their retirement. Continue reading