Tag Archives: Age UK blog

A vision for the NHS

On the 23 October 2014, NHS England published its Five Year Forward View, a vision document for the future of the NHS.

The timing, and the timeline, is very deliberate: this is NHS England’s chief executive, Simon Stevens, setting his stall for next year’s general election.

Whichever party (or parties) form/s the next government will have to decide whether they take this vision on. And whether they are willing to pay for it.

This is a crucial point because Stevens has addressed the enduring taboo of money. Politicians are largely in a state of denial about the funding crisis facing the NHS, forecasted to be short by about £30 billion by 2020/21.

That’s just under a third of the annual budget of the NHS. Stevens is clear: if you want the NHS to continue providing a universal health care service, free at the point of delivery, you cannot escape the fact that more money will need to be found.

For a pre-election period, where more spending, even on the NHS, is avoided like the plague by political parties, this is the very definition of throwing down the gauntlet.

So what does the vision say? Continue reading

Ending poverty and inequality in later life

Before getting help from Age UK County Durham, Lily, 88, was having to make painful sacrifices every day due to her limited income. This meant going to bed early just to stay warm because she couldn't afford to put the heating on.

Before getting help from Age UK County Durham, Lily, 88, was having to make painful sacrifices every day due to her limited income. This meant going to bed early just to stay warm because she couldn’t afford to put the heating on.

Last week we launched our End Pensioner Poverty campaign. Joanne Sawyer, Equality and Human Rights Policy Adviser, looks at how the issue of pensioner poverty relates to human rights in the UK.

Today in the UK, 1.6 million older people live in poverty, of whom 900,000 are living in severe poverty.  Whilst the number of pensioners living on a low income has fallen considerably in recent years, progress has now stalled and pensioner poverty levels have stayed the same.  In practice, this means constant financial worries for some older people and struggles to afford basic essentials like fresh food, warm clothes, and heating during the winter.

This unequal situation persists despite the right of everyone in the UK to an adequate standard of living which includes “adequate food, clothing and housing”, whatever their age and whatever their background.[1]  The General Assembly of the UN has stated that “older persons should have access to adequate food, water, shelter, clothing and health care through the provision of income, family and community support and self-help”.[2] Continue reading

Prime Minister discusses pension reforms at Age UK

David Cameron discusses pension reform

This week we have a blog from Caroline Abrahams, Age UK’s Charity Director.

It’s not every day that three Government Ministers come to our offices but that’s what happened earlier this week.

On Tuesday we were delighted to be able to offer around sixty older people the opportunity to talk to the Prime Minister, David Cameron, the Secretary of State for Work & Pensions, Iain Duncan Smith and the Pensions Minister, Steve Webb.

The event coincided with the publication of the Government’s Taxation of Pensions Bill, which will put into law the huge shake up of the pension system announced by the Chancellor in the Budget earlier this year.

A round table of ‘older’ Age UK staff also had the opportunity to discuss the pension reforms and other big issues for them with the Prime Minister before he joined the larger group of older people, Iain Duncan Smith and Steve Webb, where he briefly outlined the pension changes to come.

Among other things, the Prime Minister said “I think if you’ve worked hard and saved during your life you deserve responsibility in retirement about how you spend the money that you’ve worked so hard for and saved so hard for.” Continue reading

Changes to taxation of pension inheritance

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This week, we have a guest blog from Daniela Silcock, Senior Policy Researcher at the Pensions Policy Institute

The Chancellor announced at the Conservative Party conference that changes would be made to the way that Defined Contribution (DC), (money-purchase) pension savings left as inheritance would be taxed.

The current tax rules on DC pension savings are part of a set of tax rules designed to encourage people to use their DC savings to purchase a secure retirement income. However, much of the tax structure supporting this policy is being dismantled as a result of the announcement in Budget 2014 that from April 2015 people will be able to freely access DC pension savings from age 55. Continue reading