Tag Archives: Care in Crisis campaign

General Election Series: Health and social care high on the agenda at Age UK Rally

General Election rally

Age UK’s General Election Rally

This week’s blog from our General Election Series is a guest post from Mary, a campaigner from Norfolk, who came to our General Election Rally in London on Tuesday 24 March. 

With the Care Act 2014 coming into force on the first of April, we spoke to Mary, from Norfolk, about how the issues of health and social care dominated Age UK General Election rally on 24 March.

‘Last week, thanks to the efforts of Age UK, and along with 250 other  representatives of our older population, I was given the opportunity to both listen to and question senior politicians, including David Cameron, on their plans for older people’s services, should they be elected.

‘Other than applauding speakers on the triple lock, highlighting the need to retain universal benefits such as the bus pass, and voicing regret that today’s pensioners will not benefit from the new state pension, the bulk of the day’s discussions undoubtedly focussed on care and the NHS.  Continue reading

Government consultation on the proposed cap on care costs: but does the cap fit?

Jenny And James - Age Uk Case Study by Sam Mellish

Many of us as we get older will need help from social care to help with things like washing, dressing and preparing meals. But paying for care can be hugely expensive and many people find themselves having to spend all of their savings for this support in later life. The Government is proposing introducing a lifetime cap on care costs in a bid to help those facing catastrophic care costs.

What’s being proposed?

Once an individual spends £72,000 on their care the Government will take over paying their costs. The idea is that this will protect people from using up all of their savings in order to fund their care. Alongside this, people will be able to keep more in savings before being eligible for financial support. Watch our film to find out more.

Whilst this sounds like a good idea in theory, there are several issues with the proposal that affect how the cap will work in practice for older people.

Firstly, you have to be assessed by your Local Authority as having high enough needs to be eligible for care (information from page 23.) This means the cap will only apply to people with higher support needs, and money people have already spent on their care won’t count towards the cap.

Continue reading

The devastating truth of the social care crisis

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We all want the best for our parents and grandparents as they get older, and for ourselves when we reach our later years. In later life we might need a bit of help doing some of the things we take for granted when we are younger, and some older people need support with everyday things like going to the toilet, washing and preparing meals.

In a shocking analysis just released by Age UK, we see a social care system in deep decline. Despite rising numbers of older people, and growing demand for social care support, the amount spent on social care services for older people has fallen in England by £1.1 billion since 2010/11.

The sad reality behind the front doors to many homes is that every day hundreds of thousands of older people are left to battle on alone. Continue reading

A relative in need brings home the importance of human rights

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To mark  Human Rights Day, Nicky Hawkins, Communications Director for Equally Ours – a campaign set up by eight national (including Age UK) charities to talk about the importance of human rights and how they benefit us all in everyday life, has contributed a guest post. 

It’s Human Rights Day today. Many reading this will wonder what this really means. Another day, another cause or issue to be championed or concerned about – why are human rights any different?

Despite working on human rights every day, it wasn’t until my mum had a spell in hospital that I felt like I had an answer to that question. She’s being cared for mainly at home now and her hospital stay was mercifully brief. But for me, hearing about her experience – from the trauma of a bad night to the relief of having someone sit with her and explain what was going on – brought home the vital importance of human rights for people who are reliant on others for their care.

Human rights mean there’s a system in place if something goes wrong. But, just as importantly, they provide reassurance to people who are vulnerable when they most need it. Jan, a disabled woman who used human rights laws says “it helped me to feel stronger because it told me it’s ok to want to be treated like a human being.” What could be more important when you’re frightened and alone? Continue reading