Tag Archives: NHS

Ageing policy in 2013/14 – curate’s egg or turning point?

DorothyAge UK has just published its annual overview of how public policy is meeting the needs of our ageing population, Agenda for later life 2014. It reveals that the answer is a bit of a curate’s egg: parts of it are excellent, my lord. Continue reading

Government aiming to transform primary care

On the 14 April, the Government and NHS England announced two programmes aiming to improve primary care.

The first, the Prime Minister’s Challenge Fund, was in reality a re-launch. In October last year, GP practices were invited to bid for a share of a £50 million pot to improve access to their services.

This could involve extending opening hours; setting up systems for online consultations, using Skype for example; creating new services such as care coordination for people with complex needs.

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Older people deserve better care in hospitals and care homes

This blog was contributed by Dianne Jeffrey, Chairman of Age UK and Co-chair of the  Commission on Improving Dignity in Care. 

Dianne Jeffrey CBE DL, Chairman of Age UK and Co-chair of the Commission on Dignity in Care

Dianne Jeffrey CBE DL, Chairman of Age UK and Co-chair of the Commission on Dignity in Care

I have always been clear that dignity and compassion must be at the heart of our health and care system.

This is why, in June last year, the Commission on Improving Dignity in Care for Older People (made up of, Age UK, NHS Confederation and the LGA) published its report, Delivering Dignity. It was the culmination of hundreds of written submissions and oral contributions from experts, clinicians and patients. In this report we set out a raft of recommendations for changing the way we design and deliver care as the numbers of older people who need care continues to grow. Continue reading

Alcohol misuse amongst older people

Incidents of alcohol-related illness, hospital admissions and mental health disorders have all increased in the older population. Alcohol represents a growing problem for older people, their families and carers and for public services.

The data shows that:

  • It is estimated that over 1.4 million (or over 14 per cent) of older men and women in the UK drink over safe limits
  • People aged over 65+ report the highest rates of drinking alcohol 5 or more days per week
  • In England in 2012/13 there were more admissions to hospital of people aged 65+ for alcohol-related injuries and illness than of 16 to 24 year olds200x160_pint_of_beer_main

Many of the factors that can influence alcohol intake are magnified in later life and mainly stem from social isolation and loneliness, which can be triggered by factors such as a bereavement, retirement or redundancy. Continue reading