A long and difficult path – ‘doing nothing about social care is not an option’

APPROVED Caroline Dinenage - High ResBlog written by Caroline Dinenage MP, Minister for Care

If you ask anyone who works in care about the greatest challenges facing the sector today, many will point to our growing ageing population and ask, how we will continue to care for them? Continue reading “A long and difficult path – ‘doing nothing about social care is not an option’”

Anticipating and improving the future of mobility

Electric carBlog written by Mervyn Kohler, External Affairs Manager, Age UK.

One of the Grand Challenges facing society announced by the Prime Minister earlier this year is about the Future of Mobility, and the Department for Transport has now published a Call for Evidence.   The idea is that this and alongside other initiatives will help shape a Mobility Strategy which will emerge later in the year.

Continue reading “Anticipating and improving the future of mobility”

The time is now right for a UN convention on the rights of older persons

-2934This week in New York City, older people, government representatives, human rights organisations and NGOs from around the world, will meet for the 9th time to discuss the human rights of older people. More specifically, the purpose of this meeting is to consider whether it is time for the international community to have a Convention on the rights of older persons.

Continue reading “The time is now right for a UN convention on the rights of older persons”

Taking control of retirement housing?

Houses

For most people ‘commonhold’ is an unfamiliar concept. In Australia it’s called the strata system and in the US they use the term condominiums or condos. In the UK, commonhold is still an elusive idea despite legislation designed to promote it (Leasehold and Commonhold Reform Act 2002), which has spectacularly failed to deliver. Since it came into force, a paltry 20 commonhold properties have been created. At the same time there are estimated to be 5 to 6 million residential leasehold premises in England.

Continue reading “Taking control of retirement housing?”

Tackling loneliness – do we know what works?

Man_Home_068 lonely

This blog was contributed by Vinal K Karania, Research Manager at Age UK, and looks at what works in tackling loneliness.

We all feel lonely at times and for many it is nothing more than a passing emotion. For some this feeling can become entrenched, and negatively impact upon their quality of life. This can be overcome with appropriate support, but what is the right support? The What Works Centre for Wellbeing recently made a call for evidence to build a picture of what works in reducing loneliness in people at all stages of life and will report its findings later in the year.

Do we know more about what works than we realise? In short, the answer is yes:

Continue reading “Tackling loneliness – do we know what works?”

A new milestone for improving dementia care in hospitals

Nicci Gerrard on holiday with her father, John, in Sweden last year.
Nicci Gerrard, the founder of John’s Campaign, with her father John, the inspiration behind it

Today, John’s Campaign is celebrating that all acute trusts in England have voluntarily signed up to the Campaign. In this blog, we celebrate what this means for people with dementia and their carers during a hospital stay. 

Admission to hospital can be an anxiety provoking experience for anyone. For someone with dementia it can be particularly frightening: surrounded by strange noises, smells, people, equipment and routines. It can be disorientating, disruptive and scary.

People with dementia often experience poorer outcomes and stay in hospital for longer, compared with the general population. For many, a stay in hospital results in the worsening of their dementia symptoms and they leave hospital less independent. 

Continue reading “A new milestone for improving dementia care in hospitals”

Getting it right for people with dementia in hospital

The care of older people with dementia is a critical issue for hospitals. An estimated 850,000 people in the UK live with dementia and it is thought that around a quarter of all people in hospital have dementia.

Prevalence of dementia increases with age, as does the average length of time people spend in hospital if they’re admitted.

This means getting care right for people with dementia should be a central component of good hospital services. For a number of years the National Audit of Dementia has been examining how well hospitals are doing at meeting the needs of people with dementia and their families and carers.

In this guest blog, Chloe Snowdon, Deputy Programme Manager of the Audit, explains what they are looking for and how you can get involved.

Continue reading “Getting it right for people with dementia in hospital”