How exercise can improve brain health

We should all be aware that, as well as having an impact on our wider wellbeing, lifestyle factors also have an influence on our brain health and thinking skills, says Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director of Age UK

A study from the University of Canberra published today tells us that aerobic exercise can improve our cognitive abilities, such as thinking, reading, learning and reasoning, while muscle training – for example, using weights – can benefit memory and the brain’s ability to plan and organise. Continue reading

Loneliness isn’t inevitable in later life

Marjorie Barker blogs about “overwhelming” loneliness she felt in later life, what she did to combat it and the importance of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness

When you’re alone, you feel that you can’t achieve anything. This is why the work of Age UK and the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness is so important.

Image of Marjorie Barker

Marjorie Barker

Nobody anticipates loneliness, it just happens. For me it came a decade ago, when my husband Alan developed vascular dementia and I became his carer. Not only did the man I had shared so much with no longer recognise me, but I also lost contact with everything and everyone I had known before. I couldn’t go out, as Alan could not be left alone.

Meaningful conversation was no longer possible with my husband, and for seven years my main form of human interaction came at Alan’s appointments at the memory clinic.

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Charles Bonnet Syndrome: a little-known condition which affects many people with failing eyesight

A guest blog from Judith Potts on a little-know condition called Charles Bonnet Syndrome, and the charity Esme’s Umbrella she set up to promote awareness of it. 

Judith Potts

Judith Potts

My Mother was an independent lady, who lived happily on her own, enjoyed her social life and – despite her failing eyesight through late diagnosed glaucoma – completed the Telegraph crossword daily.

We noticed that her confidence was beginning to wane but what none of us knew – including her GP and optometrist – was that, as her eyesight diminished, there was a chance she might begin to see things which were not there.  Her ophthalmologist could have warned us, but he chose not to do so.

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Review of State Pension Age Report

After over a year of looking at a wide range of evidence, and meeting many individuals and organisations, John Cridland’s Independent Review of the State Pension age has published its final report. John Cridland was tasked by the Government to make recommendations around a ‘fair and sustainable’ State Pension age (SPA) from 2028 onwards.

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