Campaign against pensions changes

6 campaigners from the many thousands who have been involved in Age UK’s campaign visited No 10 Downing Street today to urge David Cameron not to increase women’s State Pension age beyond 65 until 2020. With the Pensions Bill soon to receive its final reading, this is the Government’s last opportunity to do the right thing by thousands of hard-working women up and down the country who are being penalised by the Pensions Bill.

330,000 women born between December 1953 and October 1954 will be hit hardest, having to wait between 18 months and two years longer for their State Pension.  The 33,000 women who will have to wait an extra two years, will lose on average £10,000 of State Pension income as a result.

These women have already been asked to adjust their financial plans to take into account increases in their State Pension age as a result of the last Government’s Pensions changes . If the current Bill goes ahead, this will be the second time they will have to alter their plans and retire even later.

We believe the Government should stick to the existing timetable for equalisation as agreed in the Coalition Agreement, but at the very least we are calling on them to:

  • Mitigate the effects of these changes on the worst affected groups of women, those whose state pension age would rise by eighteen months or more, and put in place transitional arrangements to protect those who do not have sufficient time to plan for a revised Pension Age.
  • Ensure there is a clear plan of action as to how all those affected the change will be contacted to inform them of the implications.

MPs across all political parties recognise the unfairness of these changes that disproportionately affect a particular group of women, who have already been hit by the pension reforms of the last Government. Age UK will continue to campaign against these deeply unfair proposals.

Find out more about our campaign on the Age UK website

4 responses to “Campaign against pensions changes

  1. Well done to those six women who stood up for those of us who are affected by this hasty and ill thought out proposal, and well done Age UK for speaking up for those of us who have worked long and hard years from the age of 15, expecting to retire at 60 we then accepted a 4 year hike on our retirement ages, but that wasn’t enough, now we are to be expected to work yet another 2 years for the pensions we have faithfully and trustingly paid in for all these years. I wonder how the government think we women can keep on working in menial jobs until their late 60’s? Have they no idea how tired we are and how worried that our health won’t last out long enough to see us to retirement? A lot of us never had the chance or the spare money to take our private pensions, there wasn’t the information in those days that there is now, the government should stick to their coalition agreement and they should also realise that giving us around 7 years notice of a change in retirement age is cruel and unworkable, we just haven’t the time to rethink our plans and save enough to manage to wait up to 2 more years.

  2. These women being discriminated against because of the year they were born deserve to be listened to and action taken to ensure they can stil retire on state pension at the age they were promised they would in the last pension age rise.
    They have no time to adjust again !
    Most have worked from 15 years of age and will have paid in 49 years of contributions by they reach 64.
    To force them to go on working and paying in for an additional 2 years would be very unjust !

  3. Thanks to Age Uk for all the work on our behalf. I left school at the age of 16 and started work immediately. I have never been in a job that provided a pension or had the means to provide my own, but have worked hard and paid my contributions, I will have paid for 50 years if I am made to continue until the age of 66 Surely we have paid enough and we deserve the pension we were promised. One increase in pension age is enough. A second is cruel.

  4. It would be interesting to know what the geriatric legions feel about the changes having worked most of thier lives.

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