Implementing John’s Campaign – improving the quality of care and experiences of people with dementia in hospitals

Nicci Gerrard on holiday with her father, John, in Sweden last year.
Nicci Gerrard with her father John, the inspiration behind John’s Campaign

There’s no doubt that a familiar face, like that of a loved one and carer, can really put a person with dementia at ease during a hospital stay. The benefit to patient, family and staff is immeasurable; vital not only to settle the person, but to aid communication and prepare them for diagnostics or treatment, thereby helping professionals carry out their jobs. The carer may also be able to provide vital information and background, or support and stimulate a restless patient as opposed to leaving them confused and bed bound.

John’s Campaign, founded in 2014 by Nicci Gerrard and Julia Jones, calls for an end to restrictive visiting hours in hospitals to enable more people with dementia to benefit from the support of a carer when they need it.

Continue reading “Implementing John’s Campaign – improving the quality of care and experiences of people with dementia in hospitals”

Guest blog: Dementia Awareness Week gets the Big Lottery Fund thinking

Castlehaven Community Centre
Castlehaven Community Centre

This guest blog was contributed by Abigail Ryan, Learning and Programmes Manager at the Big Lottery Fund. The Big Lottery Fund awards grants to UK organisations to help improve their communities. 

Ways of helping people to live well with dementia have been on our minds at the Big Lottery Fund recently, particularly in the wake of this year’s Dementia Awareness Week. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this has been an emerging theme on our UK Accelerating Ideas programme, which aims to get great ideas and practice for our ageing society more widely shared and adopted across the UK. Continue reading “Guest blog: Dementia Awareness Week gets the Big Lottery Fund thinking”

Guest blog: Becoming ‘the best place in the world’ for dementia treatment

This guest blog was contributed by William Kloverod Griffiths, Policy and Projects Officer, at the think tank ResPublica

The Prime Minister wants the UK to be ‘the best place in the world to undertake research into dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases.’ The UK has indeed taken a leading role in initiatives among the G7 countries and the World Health Organisation, and the amount of money going into dementia research in the UK has recently doubled.

However, the total figure is still low when compared to funding for other conditions (such as cancer). There has also been a considerable focus on funding biomedical research ahead of research on how to best care for people with dementia. To be truly ‘best in the world’ we must see dementia not only through a biomedical lens but as a much wider issue which draws in all sections of society. Continue reading “Guest blog: Becoming ‘the best place in the world’ for dementia treatment”

Guest blog: What are the challenges and opportunities for ageing and cognitive decline for financial services?

Steven Cooper, Chief Executive, Personal Banking, Barclays UK, speaking at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016
Steven Cooper, Chief Executive, Personal Banking, Barclays UK, speaking at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016

This guest blog was contributed by Steven Cooper, Chief Executive, Personal Banking, Barclays UK. 

With over 10 million people in the UK over 65 and 850,000 people living with dementia, this is a crucial question, and one posed by the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Ageing at their conference and symposium on 3 and 4 February.

Barclays was very pleased to sponsor this conference and play an active part in the discussions. Older people provide huge benefits to our society and economy, caring for children and volunteering their time. As one of the largest banks in the UK we have a diverse customer base and older customers make up a significant proportion- around a quarter of our current accounts are held by someone over 60. Continue reading “Guest blog: What are the challenges and opportunities for ageing and cognitive decline for financial services?”

Guest blog: The team, redefined

Ninie Wang, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Pinetree Care group (China)
Ninie Wang, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Pinetree Care Group (China), speaking at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016

On 3 February Age UK hosted a symposium in London for the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Ageing, on the impact of ageing and cognitive impairment on the financial services industry. Ninie Wang Yan, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Pinetree Care Group (China) and a panellist at the symposium, reflects on the day.

In the middle of a cozy tea break, I agreed with James Appleby from the Gerontological Society of America who will be hosting the 2017 World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics in San Francisco that there had been a crucial missing piece of our discussions in all those past congresses. Continue reading “Guest blog: The team, redefined”

Brain ageing – understanding the implications for financial services

Dr Daniel Marson, Dr Debra Whitman and Steven Cooper at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016
Dr Daniel Marson, Dr Debra Whitman and Steven Cooper at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016

On 3 February Age UK hosted a symposium in London for the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Ageing, on the impact of ageing and cognitive impairment on the financial services industry. Jane Vass, Head of Public Policy at Age UK reflects on the event.

In Japan, over 4 million people are living with dementia – the equivalent to the population of Ireland, while in the UK people aged 60+ make up a quarter of Barclays Bank’s active customers. These statistics, highlighted by Professor Nakatani of Keio University and Steven Cooper of Barclays Bank, explain why the Global Agenda Council on Ageing has launched a series of events to address the links between brain health and managing our money. Continue reading “Brain ageing – understanding the implications for financial services”

Guest blog: Time is now for people powered dementia care

This guest post was contributed by Ewan King, director of business development and delivery, at the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).

“I am doing something worthwhile. I am earning my bread again”. This is what Brian, who has dementia, said about how his life has changed for the better as a result of directly shaping the care that he and others receive. He is not alone in benefiting from being involved in decisions about care.

In England, it is estimated that around 676,000 people have dementia. This number is expected to grow over the coming years. And this comes at a time when there are severe cuts in budgets, particularly in social care. So what can public services do when more traditional solutions – such as recruiting more staff or expanding services – are not open to them? Whilst at the same time we know that people with dementia – and their carers – need person-centred holistic care and support, including high quality social care. Continue reading “Guest blog: Time is now for people powered dementia care”