Finally a focus on social care…?

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As a Surrey resident working for Age UK, I felt quite confused and conflicted about how to vote in the prospective local referendum on a 15% council tax rise. On one hand, I really wasn’t happy about a huge hike in my bills but on the other hand through my work I am acutely aware of the enormous funding gap that has opened up in recent years between social care budgets and the growing number of people needing care and support. I felt grudgingly supportive of the leader of Surrey Council, David Hodge’s radical stance but not desperately keen on his solution.

Continue reading “Finally a focus on social care…?”

Social Care and Budget 2017

So the mood music in advance of the Budget was roughly correct: we have an emergency injection of funds to keep the social care show on the road plus a longer term Government review, in the form of a Green Paper, to develop a new sustainable funding approach. Whether the rescue package will turn out to be enough to persuade providers who are wobbling to stay in the market, or allow councils to do a better job at meeting rising demand over the next couple of years than they have over the last few remains however to be seen. Continue reading “Social Care and Budget 2017”

We are living on borrowed time in saving social care for older people

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Over the past year the chorus of voices calling for more funding for social care has become increasingly unanimous and urgent. Age UK’s new report, The Health and Care of Older People in England, provides stark evidence of the suffering that many older people with care needs are experiencing, and of the need for immediate action to avert system collapse.
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Attendance Allowance – a vital support

Georgie Scott

This blog was contributed by Ceri Smith, Campaigns Manager, at Age UK. 

As we age, many of us will develop long-term illnesses and disabilities and very often this means a higher price tag for day-to-day things that can help us to remain healthy and independent. Attendance Allowance is a nationally administered, non means-tested, weekly payment that helps older disabled people meet some of the extra costs they face. Attendance Allowance is one part of our care system that actually works well, supporting people and helping them to manage and maintain their independence. Continue reading “Attendance Allowance – a vital support”

Can we really afford not to fund social care?

At Prime Minister’s Question time just before the Autumn Statement, this Wednesday afternoon, The leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, chose to focus his questions to the Prime Minister on the funding crisis in social care. Corbyn asked the Prime Minister about the more than 1 million people who are not receiving the social care they need, the impact this is having on emergency hospital admissions, the fact that it is causing people to be stranded in hospital for longer than they need, the worry and fear that people face in old age and the stress that it places on NHS and social care staff.

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Brexit: Unknown unknowns

We are repeatedly being told that “Brexit means Brexit” – but what does that actually mean? At the moment we are still a long way from really understanding the impact of Brexit on our daily lives. The Minister in charge of Brexit, David Davis, told Parliament last week that he didn’t yet know what sort of arrangements the UK would end up with in terms of trade, free movement of people or indeed any of the other hundreds of areas of policy which will be affected by Britain leaving the European Union. Continue reading “Brexit: Unknown unknowns”

WASPI women march on Parliament

Hundreds of women are planning to travel to Westminster today to complain to the government and their MPs about unfair changes to their state pensions. Major changes made through successive Pensions Acts in past years mean that women born in the 1950s have seen several changes to the date at which they will receive their pensions. These changes mean that the date a woman can start to claim her pension may be quite different from that of a woman who is just a little bit older or younger. These women could legitimately think government policy on pensions is unfair and the way the changes have been communicated to them has been a shambles. Continue reading “WASPI women march on Parliament”