Delivering personalisation – why today matters

Older people sitting on benchBlog written by Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director, Age UK

The eagle has landed: today the Personalisation Plan is published, something which its supporters have looked forward to for a long time. At first glance it is a conventional NHS England document but don’t be deceived by the relatively sober wrapping – a radical heart beats within.

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Help us to help you this winter

John, who lives in a cold homeWritten by Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer for England and Executive Director at NHS England

Getting the flu can be a miserable experience for anyone. Even when you are fit and healthy, flu can knock you for six, and for older people in particular it can lead to serious health problems like pneumonia.

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The NHS Plan: what will it mean for older people?

John, who lives in a cold homeBlog written by Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director, Age UK

So here it is at last, well over a hundred pages of it. If you delve into the detail, especially the really chunky first chapter which sets out the new model of care the NHS wants to develop to make it fit for the 21st century, you will find plenty of relevance to the 12 million or so older people in this country: quite right too, given they are the principal users of the NHS.

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Staying safe at home

An older man sitting by a window

Blog written by Joe Oldman, Housing and Transport Policy Manager, Age UK

We know that safe and accessible housing promotes health, wellbeing, and independence and prevents unnecessary injuries, accidents, and deaths. But for many older people, carers and professionals, finding information about different aspects of home safety and accident prevention can mean trawling through numerous websites to find what they need.

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The importance of eating well in later life

hero-fruit-and-veg-buyersBlog written by Alice Roe, Health Influencing Officer, Age UK

This week is the first UK Malnutrition Awareness Week, a joint project from the Malnutrition Task Force and BAPEN, to raise awareness of the importance of keeping to a healthy weight and eating well in later life.

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Tackling loneliness – do we know what works?

Man_Home_068 lonely

This blog was contributed by Vinal K Karania, Research Manager at Age UK, and looks at what works in tackling loneliness.

We all feel lonely at times and for many it is nothing more than a passing emotion. For some this feeling can become entrenched, and negatively impact upon their quality of life. This can be overcome with appropriate support, but what is the right support? The What Works Centre for Wellbeing recently made a call for evidence to build a picture of what works in reducing loneliness in people at all stages of life and will report its findings later in the year.

Do we know more about what works than we realise? In short, the answer is yes:

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A new milestone for improving dementia care in hospitals

Nicci Gerrard on holiday with her father, John, in Sweden last year.
Nicci Gerrard, the founder of John’s Campaign, with her father John, the inspiration behind it

Today, John’s Campaign is celebrating that all acute trusts in England have voluntarily signed up to the Campaign. In this blog, we celebrate what this means for people with dementia and their carers during a hospital stay. 

Admission to hospital can be an anxiety provoking experience for anyone. For someone with dementia it can be particularly frightening: surrounded by strange noises, smells, people, equipment and routines. It can be disorientating, disruptive and scary.

People with dementia often experience poorer outcomes and stay in hospital for longer, compared with the general population. For many, a stay in hospital results in the worsening of their dementia symptoms and they leave hospital less independent. 

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