Category Archives: Home and Care

Guest blog: How shortages in care are failing older people

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This guest blog was contributed by Gordon Cameron, Policy and Research Officer, at the Family and Childcare Trust

Our new Older People’s Care Survey has found that four in five councils report not having enough care in their area to meet demand. That means over 6.4 million older people live in these places with insufficient provision.

Older people’s care is important to all of us. Good quality care supports older people to enjoy old age with comfort and dignity. When it is not available or not affordable it causes entirely avoidable suffering, creates stress and worry for families, and often forces people into an impossible balancing act to look after a loved one alongside other responsibilities. Continue reading

Guest blog: Continuing to care?

This guest post was contributed by Morgan Vine, Chair of the Continuing Healthcare Alliance, and Policy and Campaigns Adviser at Parkinson’s UK. 

My Nan lived with Parkinson’s and developed dementia later in her life. Luckily, we found a wonderful residential home which gave her the high quality, compassionate care that she needed.  – also known as NHS continuing care or NHS CHC – was never mentioned to us, despite Nan having incredibly high needs. Looking back, I think it probably should have been. But part of me is grateful that, as a family, we didn’t have to struggle through this complex and confusing process.

Now, as a Policy and Campaigns adviser at Parkinson’s UK, I am all too familiar with NHS CHC and how it is letting people down across England.
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Guest blog: Volunteers improving the quality of life of older residents in care homes

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This guest post was contributed by Kristen Stephenson, Volunteering Development Manager, at NCVO

The Volunteering in Care Homes’ Project was a three year pilot project funded by the Department of Health to evaluate the impact of volunteers on the quality of life of older residents in care homes. The evaluation showed a profound impact on the social and emotional wellbeing aspects of quality of life and quality of care for older residents.

  • 96% of staff and volunteers reported a positive impact on the social contact that residents had
  • 90% of staff and volunteers recorded that they thought volunteers had a positive impact on residents’ feeling of safety
  • for relatives, additional eyes and ears contributed to their peace of mind

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Why attendance allowance is so important to older people

Georgie Scott

This blog post was contributed by Ceri Smith, Campaigns Manager at Age UK. 

Age UK’s new report on Attendance Allowance highlights the big practical difference it makes to older disabled people who receive it, and calls on the Government not to go ahead with a proposal to transfer the benefit to councils.  Continue reading