Category Archives: Information and Advice

Wary hearts: Romance fraud is (much) bigger than you think

Paul Cunningham (Flickr Creative Commons)

Paul Cunningham (Flickr Creative Commons)

This blog post was contributed by Phil Mawhinney, Policy Officer, at Age UK 

You probably know someone who found love through a dating website – perhaps you did yourself. But you may also have seen cases of people who thought they had met someone special online, only to lose thousands of pounds through fraud. You might think that this is a rare crime and, really, people should know better.

It might surprise you to learn that romance/dating fraud is a big and growing crime. One person who has fallen victim reports dating fraud every three hours, according to the latest figures from Action Fraud, the fraud reporting centre. Continue reading

The future is electrifying

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Two thirds of our current electricity generating plants will be decommissioned by 2030.   In the next fifteen years, they will need to be replaced with a mixture of new power stations and by generating more energy from renewable resources – primarily wind and solar, and tidal might also have a place. On top of that, we will need more electricity as we proceed with the electrification of heating and transport – some predictions suggest that we should eventually be planning for a seven-fold increase in electricity generation capacity.    Continue reading

Keeping up with emerging trends in information and advice

In the Information and Advice Resources team at Age UK, we want to make sure that our resources are innovative and keep up with emerging trends in information and advice. We are also committed to offering the public a positive experience in finding the information they need. So as well as producing printed guides and factsheets, and the Age UK website’s online information pages, we’ve also produced a number of videos. Continue reading

A practical guide to health caring

Sheelagh Donovan works in the Information and Advice Department at Age UK, writing health information for our publications and website. Sheelagh talks about a new guide on caring that she recently worked on.

Caring can be a central part of many older people’s lives. For many who have partners and spouses, it can be an expected and valued part of ageing together, so much so that they may fail to see themselves as carers.

For others, it is a no less valuable part of a friendship. As many of us live longer, it is not unusual for people in their 50s and 60s to be caring for older parents while also supporting grandchildren or a disabled adult child. Continue reading