Guest blog: What are the challenges and opportunities for ageing and cognitive decline for financial services?

Steven Cooper, Chief Executive, Personal Banking, Barclays UK, speaking at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016
Steven Cooper, Chief Executive, Personal Banking, Barclays UK, speaking at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016

This guest blog was contributed by Steven Cooper, Chief Executive, Personal Banking, Barclays UK. 

With over 10 million people in the UK over 65 and 850,000 people living with dementia, this is a crucial question, and one posed by the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Ageing at their conference and symposium on 3 and 4 February.

Barclays was very pleased to sponsor this conference and play an active part in the discussions. Older people provide huge benefits to our society and economy, caring for children and volunteering their time. As one of the largest banks in the UK we have a diverse customer base and older customers make up a significant proportion- around a quarter of our current accounts are held by someone over 60. Continue reading “Guest blog: What are the challenges and opportunities for ageing and cognitive decline for financial services?”

Guest blog: The team, redefined

Ninie Wang, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Pinetree Care group (China)
Ninie Wang, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Pinetree Care Group (China), speaking at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016

On 3 February Age UK hosted a symposium in London for the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Ageing, on the impact of ageing and cognitive impairment on the financial services industry. Ninie Wang Yan, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Pinetree Care Group (China) and a panellist at the symposium, reflects on the day.

In the middle of a cozy tea break, I agreed with James Appleby from the Gerontological Society of America who will be hosting the 2017 World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics in San Francisco that there had been a crucial missing piece of our discussions in all those past congresses. Continue reading “Guest blog: The team, redefined”

Brain ageing – understanding the implications for financial services

Dr Daniel Marson, Dr Debra Whitman and Steven Cooper at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016
Dr Daniel Marson, Dr Debra Whitman and Steven Cooper at the Global Agenda Council on Ageing Symposium 2016

On 3 February Age UK hosted a symposium in London for the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Ageing, on the impact of ageing and cognitive impairment on the financial services industry. Jane Vass, Head of Public Policy at Age UK reflects on the event.

In Japan, over 4 million people are living with dementia – the equivalent to the population of Ireland, while in the UK people aged 60+ make up a quarter of Barclays Bank’s active customers. These statistics, highlighted by Professor Nakatani of Keio University and Steven Cooper of Barclays Bank, explain why the Global Agenda Council on Ageing has launched a series of events to address the links between brain health and managing our money. Continue reading “Brain ageing – understanding the implications for financial services”

Importance of the Sustainable Development Goals for older people

Older couple with grandson

This post was contributed by Kate Horstead, Policy and Influencing Officer, at our sister charity Age International

2015 has been a landmark year for international development and for older people globally. The Sustainable Development Goals, an ambitious framework agreed by and for all countries, has been adopted and will set the scene for policies and programmes around the world. Unlike its predecessor, the Millennium Development Goals, Agenda 2030 recognises ageing and older people as an integral part of international development plans. Continue reading “Importance of the Sustainable Development Goals for older people”

Healthy ageing: a vision of the future?

On the International Day of Older Persons the World Health Organisation (WHO) has published a new ‘World Report on Ageing and Health’. Here Ken Bluestone, who leads Age International’s policy and influencing work, looks at the findings from the report. 

An astonishing transformation is taking place that has until now been absent from mainstream development thinking: global ageing. Its absence is even more surprising as the evidence makes clear that demographic changes are affecting developing countries the most.

Currently about one in ten of the population is aged 60 or over; but within a generation – 2050 – this ratio will soar to one in five.  Two-thirds of the 868 million older people alive today are in developing countries; and of the 2 billion people expected to be over the age of 60 by 2050, over three-quarters will live in low and middle-income countries. The rate of change is phenomenal.

What we do with this information will determine whether this new reality is something to welcome or be feared. This is why the World Health Organisation’s new ‘World Report on Ageing and Health’ released today on the International Day of Older Persons is so important. Its message is clear: celebrate our longer lives; invest in older people; but most importantly – be prepared. Continue reading “Healthy ageing: a vision of the future?”

A UN Convention on the Rights of Older People: from deliberation to action

Ageism is a world-wide problem and negative attitudes towards older people are pervasive in many cultures and societies, including our own. Older people are all too often stereotyped as ‘has-beens’ with no aspirations or future and even as threats to the opportunities of younger people.  The direct effect of this ageism is that older people are at major risk of experiencing discriminatory treatment globally and across a wide range of situations; from undignified and inadequate care in the household, hospitals and residential homes, to unequal treatment in employment and inadequate responses in emergency and humanitarian situations.

The UN Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) adopted in 1948 explicitly prohibits discrimination on a wide range of grounds; ‘race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status’ (UDHR, Art 2). Arguably the most glaring omission from this list is ‘age’, the result of which is that very little attention is given to the human rights of older people by international human rights mechanisms. Continue reading “A UN Convention on the Rights of Older People: from deliberation to action”

Why climate change is a medical emergency

An ambulance and cars stuck in floods‘Climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century’ is the stark opening statement of a new report published in The Lancet on Tuesday 23 July.

Continue reading “Why climate change is a medical emergency”