Pension reforms – opportunity and risk

 

Pound coins - Photo: Flickr user hitthatswitch
Photo credit: hitthatswitch, Flickr Creative Commons 

April 2015 will represent a landmark day for pensions, with an end to the requirement to use a pensions ‘pot’ to buy an annuity. For better or for worse, people at point of retirement will hold their own futures in their hands, with decisions taken at this time having implications that can be felt for many years to come.

Age UK has welcomed greater flexibility, but it’s clear that the rapid speed of change has led to significant challenges ahead for the government and the industry, as well as – most importantly – ordinary pension savers.

Disengaged savers

Age UK recently published an independently-written report, Dashboards and Jam-jars, which looked at some of the main issues facing people with average-sized pension pots. It highlighted some of the main problems that could arise – for example paying too much tax or running out of money – and suggests what can be done to mitigate these. Continue reading “Pension reforms – opportunity and risk”

Changes to taxation of pension inheritance

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This week, we have a guest blog from Daniela Silcock, Senior Policy Researcher at the Pensions Policy Institute

The Chancellor announced at the Conservative Party conference that changes would be made to the way that Defined Contribution (DC), (money-purchase) pension savings left as inheritance would be taxed.

The current tax rules on DC pension savings are part of a set of tax rules designed to encourage people to use their DC savings to purchase a secure retirement income. However, much of the tax structure supporting this policy is being dismantled as a result of the announcement in Budget 2014 that from April 2015 people will be able to freely access DC pension savings from age 55. Continue reading “Changes to taxation of pension inheritance”