Category Archives: Research

Measuring wellbeing in later life

At the start of February, Age UK launched the Index of Wellbeing in Later Life. The Index highlights what determines wellbeing, the importance of considering an older person’s wellbeing in the round and subgroups of older people who experience high or low wellbeing. Continue reading

Understanding the importance of wellbeing in later life

This graph highlights the average wellbeing score for older people across each indicator.

The average wellbeing score for older people across each indicator

This blog post was contributed by Dr Marcus Green, Social and Economic Research Manager, at Age UK.  

There can be a difference between how we say we are when asked “how are you doing?” and how we really are – through our research, we have found this to be true. As a charity trying to help older people lead fulfilling later lives, Age UK needs an accurate assessment of how older people are doing in order to support them towards this, which goes beyond a subjective measure of life satisfaction and happiness. Continue reading

Guest blog: What Keeps You Sharp?

This guest post was contributed by Dr Alan J. Gow, Associate Professor in Psychology,  School of Social Sciences, Heriot-Watt University.

As we age, some of us will experience changes in our thinking skills. People often think of these changes in terms of decline, maybe noticing their memory getting a bit poorer or not being able to solve problems as quickly as when they were younger. While some people do experience these changes, others do not. In fact, some people retain their thinking skills well.

Researchers are therefore trying to better understand how our thinking skills change (or stay stable) as we age. In exploring the variation that exists from person to person, a really important question then arises: What factors affect the changes we might experience? Continue reading

Guest blog: The science of staying active into old age

This guest blog was contributed by Professor Ilaria Bellantuono, an expert on musculoskeletal ageing, from the University of Sheffield. 

Over 10 million people in the UK currently live with pain and disability due to musculoskeletal diseases such as arthritis or fractures due to osteoporosis. The NHS annual budget for these diseases is over £5 billion per annum and musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of disability in the UK and globally.

The majority of these diseases develop with age and the resulting pain, stiffness and loss of mobility can impact every aspect of a person’s life. Simple tasks can become difficult because they require dexterity of hands and wrists, and the ability to reach up or bend down. It’s not surprising that people with musculoskeletal conditions are four times more likely to develop depression.

Continue reading