Mental health services are failing older people

Age UK’s new report on the state of mental health care for older people in England, Hidden in plain sight: the unmet mental health needs of older peoplesheds new light on the current state of NHS mental health services for those in later life.

Incomplete care 

The scale of the problem surrounding old age mental health cannot be underestimated. An estimated 1 in 4 people over the age of 65 live with a common mental health condition such as depression or anxiety, rising to a staggering 40 per cent of people living in care homes. Yet the Royal College of Psychiatrists has estimated that nearly 85 per cent of older people do not receive any help. Continue reading

Continued uncertainty for sheltered housing


The future funding of sheltered housing continues to be uncertain following the Government’s decision to defer a decision to restrict housing benefit payments for supported housing.

The failure to reach a long term financial settlement means that schemes could still eventually be forced to close and the development of new schemes jeopardised. Continue reading

Guest blog: The science of staying active into old age

This guest blog was contributed by Professor Ilaria Bellantuono, an expert on musculoskeletal ageing, from the University of Sheffield. 

Over 10 million people in the UK currently live with pain and disability due to musculoskeletal diseases such as arthritis or fractures due to osteoporosis. The NHS annual budget for these diseases is over £5 billion per annum and musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of disability in the UK and globally.

The majority of these diseases develop with age and the resulting pain, stiffness and loss of mobility can impact every aspect of a person’s life. Simple tasks can become difficult because they require dexterity of hands and wrists, and the ability to reach up or bend down. It’s not surprising that people with musculoskeletal conditions are four times more likely to develop depression.

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Brexit: Unknown unknowns

We are repeatedly being told that “Brexit means Brexit” – but what does that actually mean? At the moment we are still a long way from really understanding the impact of Brexit on our daily lives. The Minister in charge of Brexit, David Davis, told Parliament last week that he didn’t yet know what sort of arrangements the UK would end up with in terms of trade, free movement of people or indeed any of the other hundreds of areas of policy which will be affected by Britain leaving the European Union. Continue reading