Grasping the nettle: lessons for the social care green paper

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Blog written by Mike Birtwistle, Founding Partner, Incisive Health

By 2068 there will be an extra 8.6 million people aged 65 or over living in the UK, with over-65s making up 26% of the population. With more of us living longer and many people having one or more long-term conditions, more people will need access to long-term care. How will a social care system that is in crisis, respond?

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Who cares for those without carers?

John, who lives in a cold home

Blog written by Kirsty Woodard, Founder of Ageing Without Children.

Last month, the Social Market Foundation and Age UK published “Caring for Carers” examining the demographics and experiences of people providing unpaid care. Contained within it is one of the most challenging but still strangely unheralded problems facing social care now and in the future, namely – who will care for the growing numbers of older people who lack family to support them? By 2030, 2 million people will be aged over 65 without ever having been parents while still more will be unable to look to their family to support them for a variety of other reasons including estrangement or distance. The number of older people with disabilities who live alone and have no child is projected to increase rapidly, rising by nearly 80 per cent between 2007 and 2032 to 370,000. This represents a significant challenge to health and social care services that rely extensively on spousal and adult child care.

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Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) – a chance to fix a broken system?

Gary Beckwith photographed for Age UK, 51 Bristow Road, Wallington, Surrey, CR0 4QQBlog written by Alison Trew, Public Affairs Officer, Age UK.

The Mental Capacity (amendment) Bill will reach committee stage in the House of Lords next week. This Bill, which focuses on the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS), will have an impact on one of the most profound of our human rights, the right to liberty.

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A long and difficult path – ‘doing nothing about social care is not an option’

APPROVED Caroline Dinenage - High ResBlog written by Caroline Dinenage MP, Minister for Care

If you ask anyone who works in care about the greatest challenges facing the sector today, many will point to our growing ageing population and ask, how we will continue to care for them? Continue reading “A long and difficult path – ‘doing nothing about social care is not an option’”

Anticipating and improving the future of mobility

Electric carBlog written by Mervyn Kohler, External Affairs Manager, Age UK.

One of the Grand Challenges facing society announced by the Prime Minister earlier this year is about the Future of Mobility, and the Department for Transport has now published a Call for Evidence.   The idea is that this and alongside other initiatives will help shape a Mobility Strategy which will emerge later in the year.

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The time is now right for a UN convention on the rights of older persons

-2934This week in New York City, older people, government representatives, human rights organisations and NGOs from around the world, will meet for the 9th time to discuss the human rights of older people. More specifically, the purpose of this meeting is to consider whether it is time for the international community to have a Convention on the rights of older persons.

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Taking control of retirement housing?

Houses

For most people ‘commonhold’ is an unfamiliar concept. In Australia it’s called the strata system and in the US they use the term condominiums or condos. In the UK, commonhold is still an elusive idea despite legislation designed to promote it (Leasehold and Commonhold Reform Act 2002), which has spectacularly failed to deliver. Since it came into force, a paltry 20 commonhold properties have been created. At the same time there are estimated to be 5 to 6 million residential leasehold premises in England.

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