Easy ways to keep warm this winter

440x210_Snow-in-Shepton-Mal

With the night’s drawing in, winter is definitely on its way. Sadly, each winter 1 older person dies every 7 minutes from the cold weather and many more become seriously ill.

Why are older people more susceptible to the cold?

Cold temperatures can be very dangerous to older people’s health, as they not only increase the likelihood and severity of flu and respiratory problems, but being cold also thickens the blood and increases blood pressure, which increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Continue reading “Easy ways to keep warm this winter”

Winter is here…

It’s that time of year again: the nights are drawing in and winter is here. Sadly, each winter 1 older person dies every 7 minutes from the cold weather and many more become seriously ill.

How does the cold affect the health of older people?

You might think that the cold is a major cause of hypothermia. That’s a myth. Very few deaths amongst older people in the winter are from hypothermia. The lethal effects of the cold strike much before the body gets that cold. Cold temperatures not only increase the likelihood and severity of flu and respiratory problems, but being cold also thickens the blood and increases blood pressure, which increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Continue reading “Winter is here…”

A Lesson from Siberia

Portrait of a old woman in winter

In 1993, two friends and colleagues of mine alighted from an internal flight in the heart of Siberia. The light was failing and the temperature plummeted as they wound their way from the landing strip into an endless forest. They were lost. Eventually, coming upon a wooden settlement, they found shelter with the village teacher, the only English speaker for many, many miles.

Professor Bill Keatinge later confided in me that he had learned two lessons from this incident. One was to learn Russian (which he later did, with some panache). The second was to dress like the Russians. Because Yakutsk, the city which they had come to visit, is the coldest city in the world. During their trip, the temperature fell to a mere -26C. The lowest winter temperatures reach -60.

And what, may we ask, was the attraction of this cold Siberian city? Ironically, the inhospitable, intractable, bone gnawing cold was the motivation for their journey. They were part of the Eurowinter Group, a collection of Europe’s finest scientists, whose mission was to unravel the complicated story of winter deaths in Europe. Until that time, no-one had a convincing explanation (scientists call this a ‘model’) of the pattern of winter deaths in Europe which varied from one country to another. And the prime question was why on earth should the British Isles, with its temperate maritime climate, be the villain of the piece, with many more ‘excess winter deaths’ than its colder European neighbours? Continue reading “A Lesson from Siberia”