Tag Archives: Age UK blog

The Energy Revolution

The smart meter roll-out has been bumpy, and bedevilled by technical issues around its communications systems. To date, about 6m have been installed towards the goal of achieving 50m+ installations by 2020, and the Government remains adamant that that date is not negotiable.

We are de-commissioning old coal-fired and nuclear-fuelled generating plants, and replacing some of that capacity with enormous wind farms. Solar power is becoming more commonplace (nearly 1m householders now have a solar panel on their roof), and we are experimenting with tidal power and other technologies. But all our existing cables and wires are in the wrong place to transmit this electricity to our homes. Continue reading

Employment tribunal fees (at last!) ruled ‘out of order’

Older worker

The 26 July 2017 should go down in legal history. It should be remembered as the day the Supreme Court shocked everyone  by ruling that the Government’s regime of fees in the Employment Tribunal (ET) system was, in fact, illegal.

Age UK has long opposed the fees, believing they are unfair and unsustainable – if employers know they can get away with treating workers illegally, then statutory employment rights aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. The laws on age (and other) discrimination that we all fought hard for would be completely undermined. Continue reading

Welcome to the (digitally) active citizen

In 1991, Estonia enthusiastically embraced its freedom and independence from the Soviet Union, but its economy was in a parlous situation. It faced overwhelming bills just to sustain its basic public services. A leading light in its Government, who went on to serve for ten years from 2006 as President Toomas Ilves, was an autodidact computer programmer, and forcefully advocated that those public services would only be sustainable if the country embraced the digital economy. So it came to pass that everyone had to sharpen up their skills, and get used to paying their taxes, updating their health records, registering their right to citizen benefits, voting, and even applying for a bus pass online. No exceptions. Continue reading

It’s never been more important for older people to act on cyber security

This blog was contributed by Peter Wilson, Deputy Director for The Office for Security and Counter Terrorism and Head of Unit for RICU (Research Information and Communications Unit), in the Home Office. 

As we spend more and more time online – emailing friends, Skyping family, banking online – we need to think more about cyber security. It’s second nature for us to lock our doors when we go out and about – so why don’t we always take the same approaches to online security? A security breach online is not just something that happens to big businesses or celebrities. It can happen to anyone. In fact, recent reports suggest older people are increasingly at risk of cyber fraud, with more than a million older people duped by email scammers in the UK. Continue reading