Tag Archives: Age UK social care

We are living on borrowed time in saving social care for older people

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Over the past year the chorus of voices calling for more funding for social care has become increasingly unanimous and urgent. Age UK’s new report, The Health and Care of Older People in England, provides stark evidence of the suffering that many older people with care needs are experiencing, and of the need for immediate action to avert system collapse.
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Guest blog: Time is now for people powered dementia care

This guest post was contributed by Ewan King, director of business development and delivery, at the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).

“I am doing something worthwhile. I am earning my bread again”. This is what Brian, who has dementia, said about how his life has changed for the better as a result of directly shaping the care that he and others receive. He is not alone in benefiting from being involved in decisions about care.

In England, it is estimated that around 676,000 people have dementia. This number is expected to grow over the coming years. And this comes at a time when there are severe cuts in budgets, particularly in social care. So what can public services do when more traditional solutions – such as recruiting more staff or expanding services – are not open to them? Whilst at the same time we know that people with dementia – and their carers – need person-centred holistic care and support, including high quality social care. Continue reading

The more stringent the social care eligibility, the lower the quality of life of service users

After a comprehensive and meticulous review, we have recently published an academic paper that looks into efficiency in the provision of social care services for older people in England It is a difficult, technical piece; here we describe what we did and present the main results.

Efficiency denotes ‘doing more with less’ but sometimes is used as a euphemism for cuts.  This is not how we approached the issue. Rather, our yardstick was the quality of life of people receiving the services (that is, the users themselves). Higher quality of life equals higher efficiency. Simple.

Even if we focus on quality of life, we could think of efficiency in terms of either how to spend the least to generate a given level of quality of life or how to generate the most quality of life with the given bundle of resources available. We chose the latter approach. Focusing on spending the least would distract efforts away from people in need towards objectives expressed in expenditure items, sterling pounds, delivery contract clauses and the like. Instead, by focusing on making the most with what’s available we can learn about what may be behind that which matters to users of social care services and their families: their quality of life in relation with the care they get. Continue reading

The devastating truth of the social care crisis

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We all want the best for our parents and grandparents as they get older, and for ourselves when we reach our later years. In later life we might need a bit of help doing some of the things we take for granted when we are younger, and some older people need support with everyday things like going to the toilet, washing and preparing meals.

In a shocking analysis just released by Age UK, we see a social care system in deep decline. Despite rising numbers of older people, and growing demand for social care support, the amount spent on social care services for older people has fallen in England by £1.1 billion since 2010/11.

The sad reality behind the front doors to many homes is that every day hundreds of thousands of older people are left to battle on alone. Continue reading