Who should get social care?

Scene from a care homeAge UK is urging older people, their families and carers, to add their voice to the national eligibility criteria consultation to help ensure it is set at a fair level. In this blog post we tell you why it is so important to get involved.

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The long-promised fuel poverty strategy for England

A woman living in fuel povertyAt last, the Government has produced the fuel poverty strategy paper it promised in December. It falls rather short of what we hoped for.

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A Lesson from Siberia

Portrait of a old woman in winter

In 1993, two friends and colleagues of mine alighted from an internal flight in the heart of Siberia. The light was failing and the temperature plummeted as they wound their way from the landing strip into an endless forest. They were lost. Eventually, coming upon a wooden settlement, they found shelter with the village teacher, the only English speaker for many, many miles.

Professor Bill Keatinge later confided in me that he had learned two lessons from this incident. One was to learn Russian (which he later did, with some panache). The second was to dress like the Russians. Because Yakutsk, the city which they had come to visit, is the coldest city in the world. During their trip, the temperature fell to a mere -26C. The lowest winter temperatures reach -60.

And what, may we ask, was the attraction of this cold Siberian city? Ironically, the inhospitable, intractable, bone gnawing cold was the motivation for their journey. They were part of the Eurowinter Group, a collection of Europe’s finest scientists, whose mission was to unravel the complicated story of winter deaths in Europe. Until that time, no-one had a convincing explanation (scientists call this a ‘model’) of the pattern of winter deaths in Europe which varied from one country to another. And the prime question was why on earth should the British Isles, with its temperate maritime climate, be the villain of the piece, with many more ‘excess winter deaths’ than its colder European neighbours? Continue reading “A Lesson from Siberia”

A new fuel poverty strategy

A thermal image of a house

The fuel poverty strategy of 2001 (‘to eradicate fuel poverty by 2016’) has patently failed. A new one is promised in the current Energy Bill, which is completing its Parliamentary stages.

Within six months of the date of the Act receiving Royal Assent (in December or January), the Government is bound to propose a new strategy, after which there will be a public consultation, a Government response, and the tabling of the necessary secondary legislation. This ponderous process means we might not have a new strategy in place till early 2015 (though ministers hope to move faster), but clearly the thinking time has already started.

Age UK, with others, is in constant conversation with the Department of Energy & Climate Change. A key bone of contention is the targets to be set in the strategy, since these will only be real if there is funding to underpin them, and there is considerable uncertainty about the available funds. Continue reading “A new fuel poverty strategy”

Spread the Warmth

Shockingly, 24,000 older people in England and Wales may not survive the cold weather this winter – that’s 200 deaths a day that could be prevented.

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What on earth are carbon taxes?

Energy is a huge political and household issue. The dual fuel bill for an average household is £1315 per year, and that’s before the current round of price increases.

What we’ve learned this week is that Secretary of State Ed Davey wears a jumper to keep warm at home, and that British Gas is increasing its prices by 9.2%. We also learned from the Scottish Nationalists that if Scotland voted for independence and if they were to be in Government, they would cut prices by removing the social and environmental obligations on energy suppliers, and instead pay for fuel poverty programmes with the proceeds from carbon taxes.200x160_gas_hob_g_main

These carbon taxes come in two forms, and are levied on the industries emitting the largest amount of greenhouse gasses, principally carbon dioxide. The idea is to push these industries into using non-polluting energy – energy generated from wind and tides and other renewables, and from nuclear sources. The EU Emissions Trading Scheme is one of the carbon taxes and applies to all members of the EU, though the revenues go to the national governments.   Continue reading “What on earth are carbon taxes?”

Who cares about Jenny and James?

Jenny is 64 and her husband James is 74. James has dementia and is cared for by Jenny, who has put a lot of effort into getting an appropriate care package put in place.

In this short video, Jenny explains the challenges she’s experienced in trying to arrange care for James.

Find out more about Age UK’s campaign for better care at www.ageuk.org.uk/careincrisis