Analysing a recent ONS report on loneliness

This blog was contributed by Dr. Elizabeth Webb, Senior Research Manager at Age UK, and looks at a recent report from the Office for National Statistics on loneliness. 

Key statistics:

  • People in poor health are 1.9 times more likely to report feeling lonely than those in good health
  • People who are widow(er)s are 3.6 times more likely to be lonely than those who are married.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) recently published a report on the characteristics linked with feeling lonely, which found that while people of all ages can be lonely, there are some groups particularly at risk – and there is a strong association with poor health and being widowed.

Continue reading “Analysing a recent ONS report on loneliness”

Reflecting on food standards in hospitals

dianne-jeffrey400

In this blog post, Dianne Jeffrey, Chairman of Age UK and Chair of the Hospital Food Standards Panel, reflects on hospital food. 

Going into hospital can be very worrying.

You may be in pain and nervous about what’s going to happen next, feel disorientated by being in a busy environment, or find it distressing being away from loved ones.

All this can be compounded by having no control over food, or by being served food that’s unappetising and unappealing.

However, getting hospital food and drink right is critical. After all, good nutrition and hydration are a vital part of the healing and recovery process for all patients.
Continue reading “Reflecting on food standards in hospitals”

How carers can take action on weight loss in later life

Jenny And James - Age Uk Case Study by Sam Mellish

This blog was contributed by the Malnutrition Task Force for Carers Week. 

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Increasing pharmacists’ support of older people

John photographed at his home for the new 'Lets Talk Money' influencing campaign. Chadwell Heath, Dagenham.In this guest blog post, Ash Soni, President of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, writes about how pharmacists are making sure that older people are taking the right medicines in the right way.

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Guest blog: Becoming ‘the best place in the world’ for dementia treatment

This guest blog was contributed by William Kloverod Griffiths, Policy and Projects Officer, at the think tank ResPublica

The Prime Minister wants the UK to be ‘the best place in the world to undertake research into dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases.’ The UK has indeed taken a leading role in initiatives among the G7 countries and the World Health Organisation, and the amount of money going into dementia research in the UK has recently doubled.

However, the total figure is still low when compared to funding for other conditions (such as cancer). There has also been a considerable focus on funding biomedical research ahead of research on how to best care for people with dementia. To be truly ‘best in the world’ we must see dementia not only through a biomedical lens but as a much wider issue which draws in all sections of society. Continue reading “Guest blog: Becoming ‘the best place in the world’ for dementia treatment”

Age UK’s campaign for warm park homes heats up

500x281_Rebecca_Harris_MPIt’s the last day of Cold Homes Week and in this blog post, Sue Linge, Campaigns Support Officer, talks about Age UK’s campaign for warm park homes and her recent visit with Rebecca Harris MP for Castle Point in Essex to the largest park home site in the UK.

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Working in partnership to tackle excess winter deaths

Staffordshire Fire and Rescue ServiceOn the fourth day of Cold Homes Week, we hear from Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service‘s Station Manager in Central Prevent and Protect, Dez Stoddart, about the work that the Fire and Rescue Service is doing with Age South Staffordshire to tackle the problem of excess winter deaths in the county. Continue reading “Working in partnership to tackle excess winter deaths”