Guest blog: Long-term care and support- how does it work in the US?

Older woman with carer

Age UK has been sharing a series of guest blogs with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Our latest post comes from Donald L. Redfoot, Senior Strategic Policy Advisor. AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organisation, with a membership of more than 37 million older people across the USA.

Even experts find it challenging to understand the United States’ fragmented system of providing long-term services and supports (LTSS) to older adults and people with disabilities. Those who need services are often utterly baffled. The following discussion is designed to help international observers comprehend US public policies designed to support people with LTSS needs. Continue reading “Guest blog: Long-term care and support- how does it work in the US?”

Guest blog – A new ageing population: People with Cystic Fibrosis

This guest blog was contributed by Dr Jill Edwards, School of Healthcare, Leeds University.

When I was born I was not expected to live long enough to go to school, but a few months ago I celebrated by my 50th birthday. I have cystic fibrosis (CF).

Ageing with CF is now a reality for many people with the condition (nearly 9,000 in the UK). Most people with CF used to die before they became adults, but now there are more adults than children with this disease. And over the last 30 years, the life expectancy of people with CF has increased drastically, with a median age of survival ranging between 35.9 and 48.1 years. More and more people with CF are now likely to face ‘old age’, yet it is not known how prepared we are.

Cystic fibrosis is a serious, inherited, long term condition. A fault in a gene prevents salts (sodium and chloride) from passing in and out of cells in the body properly. This results in the production of thick, sticky mucus in organs. To be born with CF a baby must inherit two faulty genes, one from each parent. Continue reading “Guest blog – A new ageing population: People with Cystic Fibrosis”