Tag Archives: older people

Guest blog – Employing a personal care assistant

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This week we have a guest blog from The Pensions Regulator which highlights that all employers, including the smallest employers such as those that employ personal care assistants, should check if they need to provide a workplace pension.

As the Pensions Regulator our job is to ensure that pension schemes are adequately funded and run in the best interests of retirement savers – and that employers meet their obligations by enrolling eligible staff into a pension scheme and making contributions. Continue reading

We are living on borrowed time in saving social care for older people

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Over the past year the chorus of voices calling for more funding for social care has become increasingly unanimous and urgent. Age UK’s new report, The Health and Care of Older People in England, provides stark evidence of the suffering that many older people with care needs are experiencing, and of the need for immediate action to avert system collapse.
Continue reading

Wary hearts: Romance fraud is (much) bigger than you think

Paul Cunningham (Flickr Creative Commons)

Paul Cunningham (Flickr Creative Commons)

This blog post was contributed by Phil Mawhinney, Policy Officer, at Age UK 

You probably know someone who found love through a dating website – perhaps you did yourself. But you may also have seen cases of people who thought they had met someone special online, only to lose thousands of pounds through fraud. You might think that this is a rare crime and, really, people should know better.

It might surprise you to learn that romance/dating fraud is a big and growing crime. One person who has fallen victim reports dating fraud every three hours, according to the latest figures from Action Fraud, the fraud reporting centre. Continue reading

Combating loneliness together

Jo Cox

Jo Cox MP

The brilliant children’s story writer Judith Kerr, now in her 90’s, has commented that the problem with being widowed is ‘not that there’s nobody to do things with, it’s that there’s nobody to do nothing with. You have to make some plan for the day otherwise there’s this shapeless emptiness.’ Her words, as usual, are precise and cut straight to the heart of the issue (as well as appealing straight to the heart) and also apply to loneliness more broadly.

Having ‘nobody to do nothing with’ affects more of us than we ever knew. So many of us are lonely in fact that it doesn’t feel an exaggeration to call it a crisis. Age UK research has found that half a million people over the age of 60 usually spend every day alone, with nearly half a million more often going at least five or six days a week without seeing or speaking to anyone at all. Continue reading