Tag Archives: Recruitment

Age of opportunity: Recruiting and retaining older workers

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This blog was contributed by Joanne Sawyer, Policy Adviser at Age UK

An ageing population, the end of forced retirement and a rising State Pension age, mean that there are now more older workers (those aged 50 or over) in the jobs market.  This trend is projected to increase over the next decade – between 2012 and 2022 there will be an extra 3.7 million workers aged between 50 and State Pension age.  Alongside this, given population changes, there will be fewer younger people entering work.  Employers and recruiters consequently need to embrace the ageing demographic of the workforce.

Working life for the over 50s

However, although the overall increase in employment rates among older workers is welcome, it does not tell the full story of working life for the over 50s.  Perceptions and stereotypes of older workers – usually negative – are still firmly held, and challenging these is vital for individuals, employers and society. They affect the way that older workers are treated when in work (e.g. in accessing training or promotion opportunities) and when out of work (e.g. long-term unemployment is a particular problem for the over 50s, with 44% of those who are unemployed having been out of work for over a year, compared to 32.0% for all 16-64 year olds).  Ensuring that older workers are not forced out of the labour market, and providing appropriate support to those who find themselves unemployed, remains crucial if we are to avoid storing up social problems for the future.

A Best Practice Guide for Recruiters

Age UK believes that it is in everyone’s interests for people to be able to remain in work for as long as they desire and are capable of doing so, and that no-one should be disadvantaged because of their age.  This is why we have partnered with the Recruitment and Employment Confederation to produce a best practice guide for recruiters.

Recommendations include:

  • Understand the benefits of recruiting older workers and promote the business case for employing this age group to clients.
  • Look beyond the stereotypes.
  • Provide information, advice and training to recruitment staff to help them understand and overcome the barriers faced by older jobseekers.
  • Be mindful of the language used in job adverts.
  • Seek to use a diverse range of platforms to advertise jobs.
  • Designate an internal advocate for older people.
  • Forge links wherever possible with welfare-to-work providers and Jobcentre Plus.

We call on all recruiters and employers to look beyond an individual’s age and make best use of the available skills and expertise of all workers.

Read the best practice guide for recruiters 

Read consumer advice about employment on the Age UK website 

Guest blog – Striking a blow against age discrimination

This blog was contributed by Chris Ball, Chief Executive of TAEN – The Age and Employment Network

1st October – UK Older People’s Day and the UN International Day of Older Persons – saw the launch of a petition against age discrimination in the labour market. With age discrimination in employment made unlawful in the UK since 2006, it may come as a surprise to learn that this is needed, yet age discrimination in the job recruitment process seems to be a common experience.

The idea for the petition – led by TAEN – The Age and Employment Network – came after increasing evidence that age discrimination carries on regardless when people are recruited into new jobs.OlderWomanCallCentre

The problem is that age discrimination in recruitment is very hard to prove. So long as we have not eradicated ageist attitudes these can be expressed in the hidden, sometimes unconscious, always irrational prejudices of recruiters. Continue reading

Five years on: what impact have the Age Regulations really had?

With the end of the Default Retirement Age gaining much attention over the weekend, 1 October 2011 also marked another, perhaps less newsworthy, milestone – it was the fifth anniversary of the implementation of the Employment Equality (Age) Regulations.

The regulations made age discrimination in employment illegal, and gave workers aged 65+ rights regarding unfair dismissal and redundancy.

It was an attempt to make a clear statement against age discrimination, but one which failed because of a huge anomaly contained within it.

As well as the regulations’ good points, they also included a new policy – the Default Retirement Age – which allowed employers to forcibly retire people aged 65 and above for no reason other than their age.

What impact have the Regulations had?

To mark this anniversary, Age UK has looked at the practical impact of the regulations on employer policies and practice towards older workers. Continue reading