What now for sheltered housing?

Photo: Ell Brown (Creative Commons)

The future funding of supported housing was one of the key issues affecting older people that was put on hold during the General Election. The Government proposes to cap housing benefit (Local Housing Allowance) for sheltered and other types of supported accommodation – which could potentially harm vulnerable older people with a loss of services and the eventual closure of some schemes. Continue reading “What now for sheltered housing?”

Continued uncertainty for sheltered housing

Houses

The future funding of sheltered housing continues to be uncertain following the Government’s decision to defer a decision to restrict housing benefit payments for supported housing.

The failure to reach a long term financial settlement means that schemes could still eventually be forced to close and the development of new schemes jeopardised. Continue reading “Continued uncertainty for sheltered housing”

Guest blog: ‘We must protect sheltered housing’

 

 

Photo: Ell Brown (Creative Commons)
Photo credit: Ell Brown (Creative Commons)

There is still uncertainty about the future of sheltered housing in the social rented sector. This is important because sheltered schemes offer supportive communal housing to older people on low incomes who cannot afford retirement housing in the private sector The Government is currently reviewing its policy to place a cap on housing benefit payments for supported housing, as well as a cap on rents. This could potentially reduce the income of housing associations and their capacity to offer housing support. The ongoing financial uncertainty is also undermining the development of new sheltered schemes.
Continue reading “Guest blog: ‘We must protect sheltered housing’”

Have your say – a better deal for older leaseholders

The retirement homes sector has come under fire in recent years over reportedly unfair practices by some retirement housing providers – aspects of which have recently been investigated by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT).  Problems include confusing service charges, lack of competitive tendering for maintenance contracts, high transfer fees, high commission charges on building insurance and unfair rental charges for wardens flats.

In response to these concerns, the Association of Retirement Housing Managers 440x210-woman-leaning-on-fireplace(ARHM) – which the majority of providers are members of – has worked with Age UK and a panel of leasehold residents to improve their voluntary code of practice.  The ARHM has also given older people and their families the opportunity to help shape the new code to improve practice in the retirement home industry. This consultation comes after a recent roundtable discussion, chaired by the Housing Minister, Mark Prisk, looking at promoting best practice in the sector. This is helpful, but it is vital that as well as listening to the views of the retirement housing industry, residents also have an opportunity to express their views and influence Government policy. Continue reading “Have your say – a better deal for older leaseholders”

Sheltered and retirement housing – ‘Making it Work for Us’

Age UK has launched a new report on sheltered and retirement housing ‘Making it Work for Us’, coinciding with a meeting of MPs and Peers to discuss reforms to leasehold housing. The complexity of leasehold agreements in retirement housing makes some older people vulnerable to financial exploitation – an issue we address in our report. Older residents tell us they are increasingly concerned about lack of transparency in leasehold contracts, particular in regard to service charges.

To produce the report Age UK supported a panel of older residents to look at how sheltered and retirement housing could be improved. Most of the residents were positive about what retirement housing could offer, but had concerns about a failure to address issues around bad practice.

Why is this so important? Currently only a very small percentage of older people actually live in retirement housing; the vast majority live in ordinary mainstream housing. Yet there is a growing interest in the role of retirement housing in freeing up larger family homes for younger people.  Achieving this is difficult when there just isn’t enough affordable, well designed retirement housing in the right locations to make a real difference. Continue reading “Sheltered and retirement housing – ‘Making it Work for Us’”